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So I was going to return to The End of Policing after Are Prisons Obsolete?, but I want to let APO? percolate a little before I read more on the same topic. So in the meantime, a book I picked up to round out an order, that I know very little about: Comrade by Jodi Dean

This is pretty much all I know about this book. Also hearing uncorroborated reports that Jodi Dean "whips ass".

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As with the other theory I'm reading, I'll post a thread of quotes that I find interesting. This helps me engage with the text better. I'm not aiming to summarise or anything, so please do seek out the source material.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> The term comrade indexes a political relationship, a set of expectations for action towards a common goal. It highlights the sameness of those on the same side--no matter their differences, comrades stand together.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

I should probably also note that I'm transcribing these quotes, so any errors are almost certainly mine.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> Comradeship binds action, and in this binding, this solidarity, it collectivizes and directs action in light of a shared vision for the future.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> Sharing a room, sharing a space, generates a closeness, an intensity of feeling and expectation of solidarity that differentiates those on one side from those on the other. Comradeship is a political relation of supported cover.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> Comrades are those you can count on. You share enough of a common ideology, enough of a commitment to common principles and goals, to do more than one-off actions. Together you can fight the long fight.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> As comrades, our actions are voluntary, but they are not always of our own choosing. Comrades have to be able to count on each other even when we don't like each other and even when we disagree. We do what needs to be done because we owe it to our comrades.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> To see our political horizon as communist is to highlight the emancipatory egalitarian struggle of the proletarianized against capitalist exploitation--that is against the determination of life by market forces; by value; by the division of labor; by imperialism; and by neocolonialism.

(Examples of each removed to fit this in a single post.)

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> Today we see this horizon in struggles such as those led by women of color against police violence, white supremacy, and the murder and incarceration of black, brown, and working-class people.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> In these examples, communism is a force of negativity, the negation of the global capitalist present.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> Communism is also the name for the positive alternative to capitalism's permanent and expanding exploitation, crisis, and immiseration, the name of a system of production based on meeting social needs--from each according to ability to each according to need, to paraphrase Marx's famous slogan--in a way that is collectively determined and carried out by the producers.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> Building communism entails more than resistance and riot. It requires the emancipated egalitarian organization of collective life.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> This rejection of the party as a form for left politics is a mistake. It ignores the effects of association on those engaged in common struggle. It fails to learn from the everyday experiences of generations of activists, organizers and revolutionaries. It relies on a narrow, fantasied notion of the party as a totalitarian machine. ... Rejection of the party form has been left dogmatism for the last thirty years and has gotten us nowhere.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> As we fight together for a world free of exploitation, oppression, and bigotry, we have to be able to trust and count on each other. Comrade names this relationship.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> [The comrade relation] enables the revaluation of work and time, what one does, and for whom one does it. Is one's work done for the people or the bosses? Is it voluntary or done because one has to work? Does one work for personal provisions or for a collective good? We should recall Marx's lyrical description of communism in which work becomes "life's prime want". We get a glimpse of that in comradeship: one *wants* to do political work.

(Emphasis author's.)

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my own observations on: Jodi Dean - Comrade 

this is recalling for me some of the thinking I've been doing recently about software development, and what it means to draw a distinction between "work code" and "personal code", and how open source/free software licensing relates to that. these are great questions to ask myself when thinking about that further.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> For [former CPUSA member David] Ross, the Communist Party is what made Marxism. The party gave Marxism life, political purpose. This life-giving capacity came from comradeship. Ross continues: "The idea of politics as simply a diffused consciousness linked only to personal integrity was--is--anathema to me." His description of politics ... fits today's left milieus. Perhaps, then, his remedy--comradeship--will as well.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> "Comrade" holds out an equalizing promise, and when that promise is fulfilled, we confront our own continuing yet unwanted attachments to hierarchy, prestige, inadequacy. Accepting equality takes courage.

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Jodi Dean - Comrade 

> [former member of the armed wing of the ANC Frank] Wilderson's recollection [of addressing Nelson Mandela as comrade at a press conference] shows how comrade's equalizing insistence can be aggressive, an imposition of discipline. This is part of its power. Addressing another as "comrade" reminds them that something is expected of them.

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@wintgenstein I've just finished the first chapter and can now confirm that Jodi Dean whips ass

@Odd_Bloke i haven't gotten to it yet but apparently it details a lot of good history of the early days of the CPUSA

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